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Wolfabilene Updates Archives for 2019-10

Abilene Wide Open: The Great Gurney Race

 

 

You had to be quick at the second Great Gurney Race this month during ArtWalk.

 

That was true not only for competitors, but photographers, as well. Getting steamrollered by a hospital gurney looked like a sure way to end up on one.

 

The Hardin-Simmons University PA group beats the competition to the finish line during the second Great Gurney Race at ArtWalk on Oct. 10. The Physician Assistant students later were the overall winners of the event.

The Hardin-Simmons University PA group beats the competition to the finish line during the second Great Gurney Race at ArtWalk on Oct. 10. The Physician Assistant students later were the overall winners of the event.

 

The races benefit Global Samaritan Resources.

 

Teams raise money to sponsor their effort as well as pay an entry fee. The idea is for each team to sort aid packages for different countries into their appropriate bins, then race a gurney with a rider down to the end of the street and back.

 

Keeping with the Halloween season, the teams are costumed according to themes. Marvel superheroes, Mario Bros. characters, and the cast of Disney's Aladdin were all represented in the race.

 

Kelly Hall of the Abilene Running Company helps her team sort boxes as her helmet starts to slouch over her eyes.

Kelly Hall of the Abilene Running Company helps her team sort boxes as her helmet starts to slouch over her eyes.

 

This year, the team with the best time were students from Hardin-Simmons University's Physician Assistant program, receiving the Golden Bedpan award for best time. Appropriately, they were flush with success.

 

The Hanner Supercenter team (left) ekes-out a win against the Abilene Bone & Joint Clinic.

The Hanner Supercenter team (left) ekes-out a win against the Abilene Bone & Joint Clinic.

 

 

By 

Copyright © 2019, Abilene Reporter News. All Rights Reserved

Thursday's weather diverts aircraft to Abilene Regional Airport

 

 

Thursday's cold front that pushed through the Big Country, lowering temperatures and bringing light precipitation and northerly winds, also affected air travel.

 

An American Airlines flight from Los Angeles to Austin was among those diverted here, an Abilene Reporter-News reporter late arriving here said.

 

Cots were set up at Abilene Regional Airport for passengers.

 

Don Green, director of transportation services, said that six aircraft had been diverted to the airport due to storms in the Dallas-Fort Worth area and in Austin.

 

"Two of those flights had flight crews reach their duty time limit and had to cancel the flight here," he said. "Therefore, we had just over 200 passengers deplane and spend the night in Abilene. Of those, 40 slept in the terminal on cots provided by the Airport and the city's Emergency Management division."

 

American Airlines was working to get those passengers and other regular flights back on schedule Friday, Green said.

 

 

Passengers on a flight from Los Angeles to Austin take refuge at Abilene Regional Airport on Thursday evening after it was diverted to Abilene. Weather affected air travel Thursday. Oct. 24 2019

Passengers on a flight from Los Angeles to Austin take refuge at Abilene Regional Airport on Thursday evening after it was diverted to Abilene. Weather affected air travel Thursday. Oct. 24 2019

 

 

 

By Brian Bethel

Copyright © 2019, Abilene Reporter News. All Rights Reserved

Trying to be the '1': Wylie, Abilene among 11 band shows rated superior

 

 

The high school marching bands that bused to Wylie's Bulldog Stadium on Monday could be thankful of two things at least.

 

Megan Colwell of the Wylie High flag corps balances her flag on her chest during the band's Region VI marching band performances Monday night at Bulldog Stadium. Wylie earned a "1" rating to advance to the regional competition.' Oct 21 2019

Megan Colwell of the Wylie High flag corps balances her flag on her chest during the band's Region VI marching band performances Monday night at Bulldog Stadium. Wylie earned a "1" rating to advance to the regional competition.' Oct 21 2019

 

 

It wasn't too hot, like Sunday's 94-degree reading, and it was dry.

 

For some bands, the thankfulness extended to receiving "1" rating at the University Interscholastic League Region East Zone contest.

 

Eleven bands received superior ratings, including Wylie and Abilene high schools. Cooper received a 2 but advances because at least two bands must represent the region.

 

For Wylie and Cooper, that means advancing to the area round of competition this weekend in Odessa. From there, it's off to San Antonio for bands judged the best. Class 5A, 3A and 1A bands are eligible this year.

 

Horn player Aaron Halliburton and the other 24 members of the Baird High School marching band earned a superior rating Monday at Wylie ISD's Bulldog Stadium, qualifying for the Class 1A state contest in San Antonio next month.

Horn player Aaron Halliburton and the other 24 members of the Baird High School marching band earned a superior rating Monday at Wylie ISD's Bulldog Stadium, qualifying for the Class 1A state contest in San Antonio next month.

 

Baird, the first band to play Monday, was hoping for a ticket straight to the November competition. The only Class 1A school on the program, the band would not have to compete at an area-level round.

 

After scoring a superior rating here last year, Baird matched that and earned its first trip to the state contest in who knows when.

 

"A long time," horn player Aaron Halliburton said.

 

Senior Kydie Edwards twirls during Albany High School's UIL marching band competition at Wylie ISD's Bulldog Stadium. Albany was judged with a "3" raring.

Senior Kydie Edwards twirls during Albany High School's UIL marching band competition at Wylie ISD's Bulldog Stadium. Albany was judged with a "3" raring.

 

Did fourth-year director Gary Sherman hear a "1" performance?

 

"Uhhhhh, it was close," said Sherman, who shares directing duties with his wife, Annette. He teaches brass and percussion; she handles woodwinds.

 

"They are pumped," Gary Sherman said of his band members, who were texting the good news after it was announced.

 

Six Class 3A bands were vying for advancements — Ballinger, Clyde, Colorado, Jim Ned, Merkel and Sonora. Scoring "1" ratings were Clyde, Colorado, Jim Ned and Sonora.

 

Baird High School band director Gary Sherman stands with his student musicians before they entered Bulldog Stadium on Monday to compete at the UIL regional contest. Baird earned a "1" rating to advance to the state contest for the first time in years.

Baird High School band director Gary Sherman stands with his student musicians before they entered Bulldog Stadium on Monday to compete at the UIL regional contest. Baird earned a "1" rating to advance to the state contest for the first time in years. 

 

Among 4A bands, Big Spring, Andrews and Fort Stockton scored 1s.

 

Sonora's middle school band also got "1."

 

Extras Monday included Jim Ned's yellow brick road and cornfield, Merkel's soldier charge during its show, "The Civil War," and Albany High's twirler, Kydie Edwards.

 

Competing during the evening were Abilene's three high school bands, with Wylie hoping to advance as a Class 5A competitor for the first time.

 

The Pure Gold Band had a non-competition year as a 4A school in 2017, then another in 2018, its first in 5A.

 

The Pure Gold scored a "1," Michelle Lessing's first as a director.

 

"It feels good," she said after the rating was announced. "The kids are super, super excited."

 

She watched from the Wylie track.

 

"The show from the field is a different listening experience that being in the stands," she said. "You can feel the energy. They really got that going."

 

She said what was evident Monday night was the work put in to unify as musicians.

 

"That concept is what makes a haka," she said of her band's warrior-like theme. "That is what we focused on last week and these few days, trying to find unity in sound and spirit."

 

The lights of Wyiie ISD's Bulldog Stadium shine off the Cooper marching band tubas as the band gets into position to open its show Monday night at the Region VI marching band competition. Oct 21 2019

The lights of Wyiie ISD's Bulldog Stadium shine off the Cooper marching band tubas as the band gets into position to open its show Monday night at the Region VI marching band competition. Oct 21 2019

 

First-year Cooper director Matthew Raines said he heard "some good things" but even without the judges' comments he knew where his band needed "some improvement."

 

"We'll take the comments of the judges and adjust what we can," he said, noting the band has 4.5 hours of rehearsal time before competing again.

 

"I'm optimistic," he said.

 

Nathaniel Hernandez of Abilene High School prepares for Monday evening's UIL contest at Bulldog Stadium on the Wylie High School campus. Oct 21 2019

Nathaniel Hernandez of Abilene High School prepares for Monday evening's UIL contest at Bulldog Stadium on the Wylie High School campus. Oct 21 2019

 

 

 

By Greg Jaklewicz

Copyright © 2019, Abilene Reporter News. All Rights Reserved

Halloween events, trunk-or-treats, fall festivals in Abilene and the Big Country

 

Haunted Abilene 

 

The annual "Haunted Abilene" haunted house will be open 6-9 p.m. Oct. 25 and 26 at the Swenson House, 1726 Swenson St. Trolley rides also will be available.

 

Tickets for both the haunted house and the trolley are $25; tickets for only one or the other are $15. For tickets or information, go to hauntedabilene.com.

 

Nightmare on Elm Creek Haunted Abilene 

 

The Nightmare on Elm Creek haunted house will open at 7 p.m. Oct. 25 and 26 at the Abilene Zoo, 2070 Zoo Lane. Music and mixed drinks will be available, and a child-friendly trail will be open.

 

Boo at the Zoo

 

The annual Boo at the Zoo Halloween party will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Oct. 19 and 26 at the Abilene Zoo, 2070 Zoo Lane. Trick-or-treating, games, costume contests and more will be available.

 

Tickets are $8 for adults and $6 for children ages 3-12. Admission is free for children age 2 and younger. For information, go to abilenezoo.org/booatthezoo.

 

Halloween in the Park

 

BUFFALO GAP — A Halloween festival will be 6-9 p.m. Oct. 26 at Abilene State Park, 150 Park Road 32. The night will feature trick-or-treating, a haunted trail and a campsite decorating contest.

 

Admission is $10 per car.

 

Halloween poetry

 

The Writers' Mark will present "Tortured Hearts," a night of Halloween-themed poetry and monologues, at 7 p.m. Oct. 26 at Art Crush Studios, 1969 Industrial Blvd.

 

Admission is $5, and is limited to adults. Snacks and drinks will be provided.

 

Mall-O-Ween

 

The annual Mall-O-Ween celebration will be 6-8 p.m. Oct. 29 at the Mall of Abilene. Games, trick-or-treating and a costume contest for children up to 12 years old will be available.

Abilene Police Department trunk-or-treat

 

The Abilene Police Department's second annual trunk-or-treat is 5:30-7:30 p.m. Oct. 29 in the parking lot of the Abilene Police Department, 4565 S. First St. Approximately 4,000 children are expected to attend, and hot dogs and chips will be served.

 

Donations are being accepted to support the event. To register or for information, contact 325-676-6600, 325-437-4536 or lindsey.peters@abilenetx.gov.

 

Labyrinth of Horror

 

The Umpteenth Annual Haunted House and Labyrinth of Horror will open at 8 p.m. Oct. 25-27 and 29-31 at Play Faire Park, 2300 N. Second St.

 

Admission is $10, and includes miniature golf.

 

'The Changeling'

 

The 1980 horror film "The Changeling" will be shown at 7:30 p.m. Oct. 31 and Nov. 1 at the Paramount Theatre, 352 Cypress St.

Tickets are $7, and are available at paramountabilene.com.

 

'Ghost of a Chance'

 

CISCO — The Cisco College theater department will present dinner theater productions of "Ghost of a Chance" at 6:30 p.m. Oct. 25 and 26 in the Crawford Theatre on campus. Dinner will begin at 6:30 p.m., with the show at 7:30 p.m. A show-only production will be presented at 2 p.m. Oct. 27.

 

Tickets are $25 for the Oct. 25 and 26 performances, and $15 for the Oct. 27 performance. For tickets, call 254-442-5000 or go to crawford.tix.com.

 

Masquerade ball and escape room

 

A masquerade ball and Edgar Allen Poe-themed escape room will be conducted from 5:30-8:15 p.m. Oct. 25 at the Abilene Public Library, 202 Cedar St. Masks are required, but will be provided if needed.

 

Basic dance training will also be provided. Cosplay is encouraged. Participants must be at least 16 years old.

Fall festivals and Halloween festivals

 

  • A fall festival will be 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Oct. 19 at Little Giant Kidz, 3301 S. 14th St. A petting zoo and food truck will be available.

 

  • A fall festival will be open from 7:30-10 p.m. Oct. 19 at Abilene Seventh-day Adventist Church, 2542 E. Overland Trail. Games, hay rides, baked goods and more will be available. Admission will be two non-perishable food items.

 

  • A fall festival will be 6-8 p.m. Oct. 24 at Lee Orthodontics, 3002 S. Clack St. Candy, food trucks, a bounce house and more will be available.

 

  • A fall festival will be 6-8 p.m. Oct. 26 at Southwest Park Baptist Church, 2901 S. 20th St. Candy, game booths and concessions will be available.

 

  • A fall festival will be 6-8 p.m. Oct. 26 at the G.V. Daniels Recreation Center, 541 N. Eighth St. A car show, trunk-or-treating, games and a haunted house will be available. Admission is free.

 

  • A fall festival will be 5-7 p.m. Oct. 30 at Belmont Baptist Church, 2117 Palm St. Candy, food and a bounce house will be available.

 

  • A fall family fun night will be 6-8 p.m. Oct. 30 at Pioneer Drive Baptist Church, 701 S. Pioneer Drive. Games, hot dogs and a petting zoo will be available. Admission is free.

 

  • A family fun fair will be 5:30-8:30 p.m. at New Hope Church, 3122 S. Clack St. Games, candy and a blacklight maze will be available.

 

  • A fall festival will be 6-8:30 p.m. Oct. 30 at Rise Church, 517 N. Pioneer Drive. Games and food will be available.

 

  • A Halloween bash will be 6-8 p.m. Oct. 31 at First United Methodist Church, 202 Butternut St. Games and candy will be available. Admission is free.

Trunk-or-treating

 

  • 6-8 p.m. Oct. 23 at Grace Fellowship Church, 910 Cypress St.

 

  • 5:30-7 p.m. Oct. 30 at First Baptist Church, 1333 N. Third St.

 

  • 6-8 p.m. Oct. 30 at Elmwood West United Methodist Church, 1302 S. Pioneer Drive.

 

  • 7-8:30 p.m. Oct. 30 at Key City Church, 2826 Barrow St.

 

  • 5-7 p.m. Oct. 31 at Arrow Dealerships, 4001 S. First St.

 

 

 

By Nathaniel Ellsworth

Copyright © 2019, Abilene Reporter News. All Rights Reserved

Precision steels the show at Expo Center construction

 

 

If you wondered why new construction and upgrades at the Taylor County Expo Center cost so much — and why budget cuts have had to be made along the way, take a look at the steel structure that soon will be the new indoor arena.

 

On Monday and Tuesday, two large cranes carefully lifted into place 14 34,000-pound steel pieces that after being bolted together provide the structure for the roof of the new facility.

 

Each piece was assembled here, and the cranes, while capable of heavy lifts, were weighted further to ensure a safe lift and placement. The 14 pieces formed seven arches that will be connected and roof added.

 

The building is 300 feet by 130 feet.

 

Taylor County voters approved $55 million for the Expo Center project, which was to be built in three phases. The project called for a $19 million indoor arena for equestrian use so the Taylor County Coliseum, after its upgrades, would be available for more events.

 

The cost of steel, a necessity for several Expo Center projects, has risen, forcing adjustments in other areas.

 

The indoor arena is situated where the West Texas Fair & Rodeo carnival rides once were set up each September. Those were moved this year as construction began.

 

A crane Tuesday slowly lifts a 34,000-pound steel frame, one of 14 pieces that will form the roof structure of the new indoor event center at the Taylor County Expo Center. This was the final piece that would be fitted against No. 13 and bolted together. Oct. 15, 2019

A crane Tuesday slowly lifts a 34,000-pound steel frame, one of 14 pieces that will form the roof structure of the new indoor event center at the Taylor County Expo Center. This was the final piece that would be fitted against No. 13 and bolted together. Oct. 15, 2019

 

A worker's orange vest makes him highly visible while he works to secure the steel support beams of the indoor arena under construction at the Taylor County Expo Center on Tuesday. The last two of 14 pieces were placed. Oct. 15, 2019

A worker's orange vest makes him highly visible while he works to secure the steel support beams of the indoor arena under construction at the Taylor County Expo Center on Tuesday. The last two of 14 pieces were placed. Oct. 15, 2019

 

After large steel pieces are lifted into place and bolted to the ground support, the pieces slowly are guided together where they meet. Their weight against each other ensures stability, with workers also bolting the pieces together. Workers below use ropes to help crane operators guide the pieces into place. Oct. 15, 2019

After large steel pieces are lifted into place and bolted to the ground support, the pieces slowly are guided together where they meet. Their weight against each other ensures stability, with workers also bolting the pieces together. Workers below use ropes to help crane operators guide the pieces into place. Oct. 15, 2019

 

 

 

 

By Greg Jaklewicz

Copyright © 2019, Abilene Reporter News. All Rights Reserved

Cooper, Wylie bands taking to Bulldog Stadium turf Saturday for Big Country Marching Fest

 

 

For just $3 admission, Wylie High School is offering an all-you-can-beat buffet Saturday.

 

But it's more than drum lines.

 

The return of the Big Country Marching Festival brings 22 high school bands (there is one middle school), from the smallest of 1A classifications to the overwhelming sound of a 6A group, to Wylie Bulldog Stadium.

 

 

Junior Mark Huffines performs a French horn solo for Wylie High School's marching band show during daybreak rehearsal Wednesday at Bulldog Stadium. Wylie's annual Big Country Marching Festival is scheduled there Saturday.

Junior Mark Huffines performs a French horn solo for Wylie High School's marching band show during daybreak rehearsal Wednesday at Bulldog Stadium. Wylie's annual Big Country Marching Festival is scheduled there Saturday.

 

Abilene-area bands include Clyde, Hawley and Jim Ned high schools.

 

 

Change of day

 

Cooper High School's marching band, which will be coming off its homecoming football game the night before, kicks off the festival with a performance at 1:45 p.m., according to a preliminary schedule released on the Wylie band's website, www.puregoldband.org.

 

The Awesome Cooper Band, which originally was to travel to Birdville in Richland Hills on Saturday, stayed home instead to play locally and allow students to enjoy homecoming weekend.

 

 

Halftime shows are not just about playing music, as Wylie High School musicians bust a few moves that are part of their UIL contest show. Front row, from left are senior Lucas Zwernemann and freshman Morgan Huck, and back row, from left, are freshmen Cole Tickner and Jerry Vela and sophomore Chrissy Prince.

Halftime shows are not just about playing music, as Wylie High School musicians bust a few moves that are part of their UIL contest show. Front row, from left are senior Lucas Zwernemann and freshman Morgan Huck, and back row, from left, are freshmen Cole Tickner and Jerry Vela and sophomore Chrissy Prince. 

 

In years past, the Big Country Marching Festival was a staple of Columbus Day, as students traveled to Wylie on the holiday.

 

But, Wylie Pure Gold Band director Michelle Lessing said, there was concern the growing school district would need the day for middle school football at the stadium.

 

"Band directors have to plan in advance," Lessing said. "So we have ample time to prepare."

 

The contest was moved to Saturday.

 

 

Scheduling conflict

 

Bulldog Stadium lights are needed for morning band rehearsals before the start of classes at Wylie High School. The Pure Gold Band is host of Saturday's Big Country Marching Festival.

Bulldog Stadium lights are needed for morning band rehearsals before the start of classes at Wylie High School. The Pure Gold Band is host of Saturday's Big Country Marching Festival.

 

While it helped secure the festival and ensured it would continue, the date change didn't lost one of the city's three high school bands.

 

Abilene High's band won't be part of the contest, according to director Jonathan Kraemer. Instead, they're taking part in the Bands of America West Texas Regional Championship, competing against bands from as far away as Granbury, Wylie East (near Dallas), Mansfield Summit, Timber Creek and Clovis, New Mexico.

 

 

This competition at Ratliff Stadium in Midland scheduled the AHS performance for 2 p.m.m with finals in the evening.

 

So, for 6A bands, Wylie's annual festival features only San Angelo Central High School, which will close the high school portion of the event with an 8:30 p.m. performance. 

 

The event hosts, directed by Lessing, will precede Central at 8:15 p.m.

 

The McMurry University band will play at 8:45 p.m. while judges prepare their tallies.

 

Lessing said she's hoping to use the festival to continue perfecting their show, which they'll take to future competitions in the University Interscholastic League marching season.

 

 

Making strides

 

Lessing said judges will provide important feedback with only nine days before the regional competition, back at Bulldog Stadium on Oct. 21.

 

"We view every performance as an opportunity we get to to raise our bar up," Lessing said. "For the area schools coming to do UIL, I feel this helps immensely. We're asking the judges we've hired to dig deep and give some meaningful feedback we can use."

 

Sophomore Justin Pillard braces a wood prop against a strong breeze during Wylie High School marching band practice Wednesday morning. The Pure Gold Band rehearsed its UIL show in preparation for Saturday's Big Country Marching Festival at Bulldog Stadium.

Sophomore Justin Pillard braces a wood prop against a strong breeze during Wylie High School marching band practice Wednesday morning. The pure Gold Band rehearsed its UIL show in preparation for Saturday's Big Country Marching Festival at Bulldog Stadium.

 

Wylie, having moved from 4A to 5A before the start of the 2018-19 school year, is eligible for the state marching contest, as is Cooper High, for the first time since the 2017-18 school year because of how the every-other-year scheduling fell.

 

Lessing said her band has been focusing on the fundamentals through the long wait to return to eligibility, studying videos from past 5A championship performances and working not only on sound but also entertainment value.

 

Meanwhile, first-year Cooper director Matthew Raines also has an opportunity to push Cooper to greater heights.

 

 

New guy, same goal 

 

Under former director Clay Johnson, Cooper gave a strong performance in the UIL area competition two years ago and served as an alternate for the state competition, though they didn't make the final cut.

 

Raines, though, isn't worried about the past. He, too, is just focused on getting better every time the students take the field.

 

"The way we're performing, each performance I would like to make better than the last," Raines said. "I'm training the students and bringing to their attention the musicality of what they're performing, no matter the distractions or venue they're in, and making it the best every time."

 

Raines said he's looking for his group to follow in past Cooper footsteps and make it to the finals in the area competition, which will be at Ratliff Stadium on Oct. 27.

 

"But we'd all love to make it to state," he added.

 

Megan Colwell, a senior, prepares to catch her rifle during Wylie High School's Pure Gold Band rehearsal at daybreak Wednesday at Bulldog Stadium.

Megan Colwell, a senior, prepares to catch her rifle during Wylie High School's Pure Gold Band rehearsal at daybreak Wednesday at Bulldog Stadium.

 

 

By Timothy Chipp

Copyright © 2019, Abilene Reporter News. All Rights Reserved

When your loved one is diagnosed with cancer, here's how you can help

 

 

Take an active role in their next steps and seek out worthy organizations to support.

 

 

Some people prefer to share their diagnosis with friends and extended family to build a strong support system right away.

Some people prefer to share their diagnosis with friends and extended family to build a strong support system right away

 

A cancer diagnosis can be devastating. That’s why when your loved one finds out that they have cancer, it’s important to show your support in any way possible.

 

No matter how eager you are to help, however, it can be difficult to know exactly what to do. Perhaps your loved one doesn’t know what to ask for and you don’t know what to offer.

 

If you want to be supportive but aren’t sure where to get started, here are just a few of the ways in which you can be helpful:

 

 

Participate in discussions with doctors

 

After a cancer diagnosis, each successive doctor’s visit can feel even more overwhelming than the last. Help your loved one prepare for their appointments by reading up on what to expect. Then, work with them to come up with a list of questions to ask in advance.

 

If you can, tag along for the actual appointment to make sure that they don’t forget to ask their questions and to help them remember any instructions from the doctor for follow-up actions. Knowing that someone else is there to listen and to remember anything important can help your loved one stay relaxed.

 

 

Gather family members together to share the diagnosis

 

Some people prefer to share their diagnosis with friends and extended family right away, while others want to take more time to process the news either by themselves or with their immediate family only.

 

You shouldn’t push your loved one to share the news before they’re ready, but you can certainly offer to do your part in making the announcement easier when they do decide to share the news. Perhaps that means organizing a formal gathering for friends and family, so that your loved one only has to share their story once instead of having dozens of separate conversations.

 

Alternatively, some people diagnosed with cancer may find it easier if someone else spreads the news, so that they don’t have to talk about it or answer questions that bring up difficult sentiments.

 

Since different people prefer different approaches, the best way to support your loved one is to express your desire to help and perhaps offer some of the different options above.

 

 

Help prepare your loved one for the path forward

 

While every treatment plan will look a little bit different, it’s important for someone with cancer to be well-versed in what to expect during the path ahead.

 

Whether that means chemotherapy treatments, surgery, lifestyle changes or a combination of all three, having someone to do the research with them will help make the road ahead less frightening. You can also help them learn how to use any equipment that they’ll need, such as a wheelchair, an ostomy bag or any other items or tools that they’ll need to incorporate into their life.

 

Sometimes, the best way you can help your loved one prepare is to put them in touch with someone who has been through a similar process.

 

 

Discover organizations that are doing great work to combat cancer

 

While supporting your loved one’s individual journey is important, another way to show your commitment is to link up with other organizations that are doing their part to help combat cancer on a larger scale. 

 

If you don’t know where to get started, take a closer look at groups that local organizations actively support. For example, First Bank Texas works with Hendricks Health Care, the American Cancer Society, and Cancer Services Network.

 

“It is important to First Bank Texas to be involved in our community and what is important to the people who make up that community,” said Darbi Bratton, First Bank Texas’ Compliance Officer, VP.

 

Supporting cancer-related nonprofits also supports the people who live in our towns, go to our churches and we see every day while meeting our banking needs.”

 

Whether you provide financial support, volunteer, or, there are many ways to help these groups deepen their impact. You can also make sure to give your business to companies that support these organizations. Not only will you be making a difference in the long-term battle against cancer, but it’s another great way to remind your loved one that you and so many others truly care.

 

For more information about First Bank Texas’s corporate social responsibility efforts and work with organizations combating cancer, click on the “First Bank Cares” tab at www.go2fbt.com.  

 

Or, if preferred:

 

Call 325-674-1885 or visit First Bank Texas to start planning your financial goals.

First Bank Texas Member FDIC Equal Lending Provider

 

*First Baird Bancshares and its subsidiaries, including First Bank Texas, do not provide tax, legal or accounting advice. The information here is for informational purposes only, and is not intended to provide, and should not be relied on for, tax, legal or accounting advice. You should consult your own tax, legal and accounting advisers before engaging in any transaction.

 

Members of the editorial and news staff of the USA Today Network were not involved in the creation of this content.

 

 

 

By Jessica Levy from First Bank Texas

Copyright © 2019, Abilene Reporter News. All Rights Reserved

Shoot for the moon at Abilene State Park

 

 

In recognition of International Observe the Moon Night, the Big Country Master Naturalists will conduct a night of moon watching from 7:30-10:30 p.m. Saturday at Abilene State Part, 150 Park Road 32 in Buffalo Gap. Volunteers will have telescopes set up across from the swimming pool.

 

Participants are encouraged to bring chairs, blankets, insect repellent and binoculars, and are asked to dim headlights as approaching the area. Park entry will be waived.

 

West Texas Book Festival

 

The 19th annual West Texas Book Festival kicks off Friday with a workshop by Mary Helen Specht, "Writing is Rewriting: The Craft of Revision," at noon at the Abilene Public Library, 202 Cedar St.

 

The festival will continue from 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Saturday at the Abilene Convention Center, 1100 N. Sixth St., with free workshops and book signings throughout the day. Children's authors will speak at 9 a.m., and the Boots and Books Luncheon, featuring James Ward Lee, will begin at 11:30 a.m.

 

The festival will conclude Sunday with the Local Author Showcase and Reception at 2 p.m. at the South Branch of the Abilene Public Library, in the Mall of Abilene.

 

All workshops are free. Luncheon tickets are $30; call 325-668-1118 for ticket availability.

 

Wizards of Abilene

 

Fanboys will conduct "Wizards of Abilene," a Harry Potter-themed fair, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday and Sunday in the Women's Dillards Courtyard in the Mall of Abilene. Vendors, entertainment and more will be available. Admission is free.

 

Fall Stomp

 

The 2019 Fall Stomp dance — featuring the Abilene Christian University Jazz Band and Swing Cats, as well as the Hardin-Simmons University Jazz Band — will begin at 8 p.m. Friday at the Elks Club Ballroom, 1174 N. First St. A beginner dance lesson will be presented at 7 p.m.

 

Admission is free.

 

'Working'

 

A production of the musical "Working" will be presented at 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, and at 2 p.m. Sunday, in Van Ellis Theatre at Hardin-Simmons University.

 

Tickets are $15 for adults; $10 for students, seniors and military; and $5 for HSU faculty, staff and students.

 

Corks and Caps

 

BROWNWOOD — The Corks and Caps beer and wine tasting event will be 6-11 p.m. Saturday at the Depot Plaza. Live music, food trucks and a cigar area will be available.

 

Tickets are $25 in advance and $35 at the gate, which includes 10 sample tabs. Concert-only tickets are $15 in advance and $25 at the gate. For information, go to VisitBrownwood.com.

 

And more ...

 

  • A free showing of "World War Z," rated PG-13, will begin at 2:30 p.m. Friday at the Abilene Public Library, 202 Cedar St.

 

  • STEPHENVILLE — The Tarleton State University choral program will present its fall concert at 7:30 p.m. Friday in the Clyde H. Wells Fine Arts Center on campus. Admission is $5.

 

  • The "Fest-Of-Fall" seasonal celebration will be open from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday at Frontier Texas!, 625 N. First St. Games, music, magic, food and more will be available. Admission is free.

 

 

 

By Nathaniel Ellsworth

opyright © 2019, Abilene Reporter News. All Rights Reserved

US awards 3 Texas border wall contracts worth $812.6 million

 

 

DALLAS (AP) — The U.S. government has awarded three contracts worth more than $812.6 million for construction of about 65 miles of new border wall along the lower Rio Grande in South Texas.

 

In a statement issued Monday, U.S. Customs and Border Protection and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers say the contracts were awarded Sunday to two contractors. The wall projects are to include steel bollard walls of 18-to-30 feet in height, all-weather roads, lighting, security cameras and other technology in 19 separate segments in Starr, Hidalgo and Cameron counties.

 

The statement says the walls will go up, starting early next year, where none now exist but not in areas prohibited under the CBP's 2019 appropriation. The sector is the CBP's busiest, accounting for about 40 percent of its immigrant apprehensions.

 

 

Workers work on a wall being built by Monument One, an official marker at the spot where New Mexico, Texas and the Mexican state of Chihuahua converge, by Border Highway West, near Executive Center Boulevard Monday, May 27, by "We Build the Wall" organization on land owned by American Eagle Brick Company.

Workers work on a wall being built by Monument One, an official marker at the spot where New Mexico, Texas and the Mexican state of Chihuahua converge, by Border Highway West, near Executive Center Boulevard Monday, May 27, by "We Build the Wall" organization on land owned by American Eagle Brick Company.

 

 

By Associated Press

Copyright © 2019, Abilene Reporter News. All Rights Reserved.

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